U.S. imports more citrus and blueberries, fewer avocados and bananas

U.S. imports more citrus and blueberries, fewer avocados and bananas in October

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U.S. imports more citrus and blueberries, fewer avocados and bananas in October

The U.S. imported a lower value of avocados and bananas in October, but more citrus and blueberries, new USDA data shows.

Avocado imports fell by 16 percent to $169 million - the same level recorded in October 2018.

Mexico was the main supplier during the month, providing 99 percent of volumes, but imports from Chile in October saw a notable drop, coming in at just $1.1 million compared to ten-times that last year and twenty times that the year before.

Banana imports meanwhile dropped by eight percent to $149 million, which is the lowest level for the month since 2016.

The decline was driven by Guatemala, whose exports to the U.S. fell by 19 percent to $67 million. Costa Rica held stable at $32 million, while Honduras notched a 24 percent increase to $21 million.

For blueberries, imports into the U.S. rose by 22 percent to $156 million, setting yet another consecutive record for October, having been valued at just $101 million in 2017.

Peru, which was the leading supplier during this period, saw volumes rise by 28 percent to $132 million. Mexico rose by 41 percent to $17 million. Argentina has seen a substantial decline in its October blueberry shipments to the U.S., with just $6 million registered this year, despite $42 million of imports being recorded in 2016.

Citrus also saw a significant year-on-year rise in terms of imports to the U.S. in October. The value of trade rose by 23 percent to $131 million. This was driven by mandarins, which rose by 22 percent to $39 million, and oranges, which grew by 47 percent to $24 million. Lemons fell by 7 percent to $30 million.

Shipments from Chile, the main supplier during the month, rose by 48 percent to $64 million, while from Mexico they were flat at $44 million and from South Africa they more-than-doubled to $16 million.

 

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