China to produce more cherries, peaches and nectarines in 2022-23

China to produce more cherries, peaches and nectarines in 2022-23

China to produce more cherries, peaches and nectarines in 2022-23

Chinese production of cherries, peaches and nectarines is forecast to rise in 2022-23, according to a USDA report.

The report said domestic cherry volumes would rise by 8 percent year-on-year to 650,000 tons in the marketing year from April 2022 to March 2023.

Shandong, the largest cherry producer, suffered from high temperatures and drought during pollination, which is likely to cut provincial production by 20-30 percent.

However, production gains in other cherry producing areas, especially in southwestern and northwestern provinces, will offset the production losses in Shandong.

Cherry production, including in greenhouses, is expected to continue rising in the next few years as new plantings begin bearing fruit. The lingering pandemic situation has had little impact on cherry farming and production, according to farmers.

Logistics disruptions related to Covid-19, coupled with soaring fuel prices, have pushed up transportation costs, even domestically.

Cherries are reportedly the most profitable fruit in China and favorable market returns have triggered farmers in many provinces to grow cherries. Chinese farmers plant mostly early and mid-maturing varieties, such as Beauty Early (dominant variety), Red Lantern, Brooks, Summit, Russia 8, Van, Black Pearl, Santina, and Rainier.

Meanwhile, china’s peach and nectarine production is forecast at 16.8 million tons in 2022-23 (January-December), an increase of 5 percent year-on-year.

Peach growers report favorable growing conditions in most peach-producing areas, especially those in southern China, leading to a larger crop. Traders also report that fruit quality of early variety peaches, which were harvested in late May 2022, is better than last season.

China’s peach production is expected to remain stable or slightly increase in the next few years with better yields, despite slowly declining planted area.

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