Strawberries could help fight heart disease, study says

Strawberries could help fight heart disease, study says

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Strawberries could help fight heart disease, study says

As we approach the end of February, known as American Heart Month, recent studies have shown that strawberries have great potential in fighting the most common heart diseases.

The latest research on this popular red fruit, including their heart health benefits, was presented at the 9th biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium (BHBS) in Tampa, FL. 

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study showed that a diet low in fruit is among the top three risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. 

According to  Britt Burton-Freeman, Ph.D., professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology and BHBS Heart and Healthy Aging Session Chair, “accumulating evidence in cardiometabolic health suggests that as little as one cup of strawberries per day may show beneficial effects.”  

This research adds to the growing body of scientific evidence supporting the role of strawberry consumption in promoting heart health. 

“Our study supports the hypothesis that strawberry consumption can improve cardiometabolic risks,” said lead investigator Arpita Basu, Ph.D., R.D.N., associate professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Studies demonstrate that the cardiometabolic benefits of strawberry consumption are multi-faceted and may include decreased total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, increased vascular relaxation and tone, decreased inflammation and oxidative stress, decreased insulin resistance, and decreased blood sugar. 

Additionally, clinical trials have linked strawberries to improvements in various markers for cardiovascular disease, including lipid levels.  

In one randomized controlled crossover trial of 33 obese adults, daily consumption of strawberries at a dose of two-and-a-half cups per day significantly improved insulin resistance and moderately improved high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size in comparison to the control group.  

“Furthermore, we believe this evidence supports the role of strawberries in a ‘food as medicine’ approach for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in adults,” said Basu.

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